Kick-start your fishing: Pole Fishing Basics

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Clint takes a look at Pole fishing basics dealing with elastics, rigs and handling the pole. Using this popular style of fishing and with the help of non angler Andi, he shows just how easy it can be to start catching.

The fishing position

Seat position
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Seat position

 

It is always better to learn using shorter lengths of pole and 6-7 metres is ideal for the beginner.

The best way to sit is slightly to the side of the seat box with the pole resting across the thighs.

The right hand grips the pole with the forearm resting along the the top of the pole (opposite for left handers). The left hand supports the pole.

The pole should be parallel to the water surface with the tip held off the water to allow a little slack in the line between float and elastic.

Bringing them in

Bringing them in
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Bringing them in

If the fish is hooked you can estimate its size by the amount of elastic stretching out from the pole. If the fish is running wait until it stops before bringing the pole back. You may need to add a section of pole if it keeps going. Once the run stops feed the pole back through your hands keeping it parallel to the water. As you feed the pole back look for the roller and slide the butt section over it. You can then look at the elastic as you slide the rest of the pole back over the roller.
The Strike

The strike
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The strike

From this position the strike is a simple lift of the left heel, the resulting upward movement is enough to set the hook home. If the bite is missed just lower the float back into the water, the fish might have another go!

 

 

Instant success

Success!
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Success!

Andi had never ever fished before these shots were taken and following Clint’s guidance within half an hour she had caught carp, tench, skimmers and roach. Follow these tips and you should catch more like this on the pole this summer.

 

 

Line to elastic connection

Plastic connector
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Plastic connector

The line is attached to the elastic and the most popular way for the pleasure angler to achieve this is to attach a plastic connector to the end of the elastic. A loop in the end of the line is slipped over a hook on the connector and a sleeve clicks in place to secure the line.

 

 

Rigs

Rigs
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Rigs

The line float, shot and hook are referred to as a rig. These can be bought ready to fish and there are several types. Attach the loop to your connector, unravel the rig from the winder, then plumb the depth of the swim. For better control cut the rig down to size say about 12 – 18 inches from the float to elastic. Double check the shooting and add or subtract so that the bristle is half showing above the water

Poles
There are plenty of inexpensive poles on the market so you don’t have to spend thousands on the latest hi-tec model to catch fish. Most poles start at 11 or 12 meters in length and are sectional so they can be fished at shorter distances.

Pole Roller

Pole roller
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Pole roller

A Pole roller positioned behind the angler helps when shipping the pole in and out. It prevents the pole being damaged on rough ground and helps to balance longer lengths of pole.

 

 

 

Elastics

Elastics
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Elastics

Elastic acts as a shock absorber and stops the fish breaking the line when it swims. The elastic runs internally through the top set of the pole (usually the top two or three sections) attached to a conical bung at the base.
Choose your elastics to suit the fish you are likely to catch and in the summer catch carp on a grade 12 or 14 elastic. Tensioned quite soft these grades will also land the softer mouthed swimmers.